NMN Enhances Aerobic Capacity in Runners

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by Nils Osmar. January 1, 2022

Animal studies have shown significant benefits (in rats and mice) from being doses with NMN. But does NMN work in humans? According to this randomized, double-blind study, it does, and the effect is dose dependent.

  • “Nicotinamide mononucleotide supplementation enhances aerobic capacity in amateur runners”
  • “A six-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-arm clinical trial including 48 young and middle-aged recreationally trained runners”
  • “A six-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-arm clinical trial including 48 young and middle-aged recreationally trained runners of the Guangzhou Pearl River running team was conducted. The participants were randomized into four groups: the low dosage group (300 mg/day NMN), the medium dosage group (600 mg/day NMN), the high dosage group (1200 mg/day NMN), and the control group (placebo).
  • “Each group consisted of ten male participants and two female participants. Each training session was 40–60 min, and the runners trained 5–6 times each week. “

Results:

“The results of this study reveal that exercise training combining with the supplementation of NMN further lift ventilatory threshold in amateur runners, the benefit is dose-dependent and muscle-related.

“NMN increases the aerobic capacity of humans during exercise training, and the improvement is likely the result of enhanced O2 utilization of the skeletal muscle.”

My notes:

  • This is one of several recent studies showing benefits of supplementation with NMN in humans (in this case, trained athletes).
  • It corresponds with the anecdotal reports from some members of this group that starting on NMN increased their aerobic capacity and improved their workouts.
  • Studies in obese mice have found that NMN lowers the % of body fat. In this study, in humans, it did not affect body fat percentage. But it was not expected to because the participants were athletes and already had a low BMI.
  • One interesting thing about this study is that participants were given different amounts of NMN. Some were given 300 mg of NMN/day; some 600 mg; some 1200 mg. (Some received a placebo) The response was dose-dependent with more NMN providing more of an effect.
  • It’s interesting also that the NMN was given in two half-doses. (The athletes taking 1200 mg took 600 mg twice a day.) This raises the familiar question of whether there might be a benefit to taking it in half-doses, instead of taking it all at once in the morning as many of us are doing.

To read the original study, click here

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